Monday, September 29, 2008

Man Hits Back Of Truck At 120mph, Gets Stuck & Dragged (NSFW)

This crash was at 169 near Admiral exit on April 17th 2007in Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.

How would you like to be a truck driver, who walks around back and see THIS hanging from the ass end of your truck?

They said that the dude hit the back end of the truck at about 120+ mph.

These are the pictures from a motorcycle accident that happened on April 17th 2007 on Highway 169 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA. The guy was going over 120+ mph at around 2 am when he hit the back of this Yellow truck. The truck was going at normal speed and the driver did not know what had happened. He was dragged approximately a mile before the truck stopped. Highway 169 is known for late night speed driving and trick driving of motorcycles. This guy's friend was killed 1 week after this while again going on his motorcycle at 120+ mph on Highway 169. Please be aware of what you're doing at all times..... and watch your speed.













The image
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Origins: The fatal accident depicted above took place on U.S. 169 near Tulsa, Oklahoma, during the early morning hours of 17 April 2007. The motorcyclist, 26-year-old Brandon Lee White of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, was traveling at an estimated 120+ mph when his motorcycle struck the back of a tractor-trailer rig.

According to the newspaper Tulsa World:
Police said the truck driver reported hearing a bump and then seeing debris from the motorcycle going past him. When he managed to pull over, he saw that a man was embedded in the back of his trailer.

White was dead at the scene.
Brandon's family said that they hoped his unfortunate death at least would help to bring attention to the issue of motorcycle safety:
"If I can save one mother, one father from going through what I've gone through, then it's worthwhile," said Broken Arrow resident Dennis White, Brandon White's father. "I can't be mad, but I know I have to do something. I've got to make a positive out of this."

Despite the hurt, the family members said they hope something good — a review of motorcycle safety laws — comes out of the recent death.

Helmet requirement laws, harsher penalties for speeding on a motorcycle, and community-based services to decrease drunken driving are among measures about which the family hopes the two young men's deaths spark a discussion.

Taking away a rider's motorcycle and motorcycle license for going a certain amount over the speed limit would be one way to curb speeding on bikes, said the elder White, who has ridden motorcycles for several years.

"That's the only thing that would make me think — that I'm going to lose it (his motorcycle)," he said. "I'm not a lawmaker, but I'm a biker, and that's the only thing that would work."

White said clubs that don't serve alcohol would go a long way toward helping reduce drunken-driving deaths for youths by providing them a hangout without the temptation of drinking and driving.

"We've got to do something to save these kids," he said. "We've got to do something to support them.
A few inaccuracies have crept into the text accompanying forwarded versions of these pictures. A 2008 variant carried the closing legend "He lived. Wear your helmet!", but unfortunately Brandon Lee did not survive the accident despite his wearing a helmet. Also, the friend of Brandon's who "was killed one week after this on his motorcycle going 120+ mph on Highway 169" referenced in the second example above was 21-year-old Devin Seigal, who was killed in a similar motorcycle accident five days after Brandon's death (and had, in fact, attended Brandon's funeral).

2 comments:

  1. I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

    Alena

    http://www.freegrantguru.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't think harsh penalties/confiscation is a good idea, just makes people run harder and take more risks. Show people pictures like this and educate them better is more likely to improve safetly.

    ReplyDelete